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Difference between revisions of "Margaret Murray"

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[[File:Margaret Murray rand.jpg|thumb]]
 
[[File:Margaret Murray rand.jpg|thumb]]
'''Margaret Murray'''  (*13 July 1863 in [[Calcutta|Kolkata]]- 13 November 1963) was an English Egyptologist and [[Anthropology|anthropologist]] whose theory - also known as ''the [[Witch-cult hypothesis]]'' - about a surviving pre-Christian, pagan religion devoted to a Horned God heavily influenced later religious and magical movements like [[wicca]]. She was one of the chief proponents of the theory of a [[coven]] and became famous with her work ''[[The Witch Cult in Western Europe]]'' (1921). Although her theory about the pre-Christian Witch-cult is now generally considered obsolete, a few academics like [[Carlo Ginzburg]] still adhere to some of her principles, such as the idea that [[fertility cult]]s may have existed in Premodern Europe.
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'''Margaret Murray'''  (*13 July 1863 in [[Calcutta|Kolkata]]- 13 November 1963 in Welwyn) was an English Egyptologist and [[Anthropology|anthropologist]] whose theory - also known as ''the [[Witch-cult hypothesis]]'' - about a surviving pre-Christian, pagan religion devoted to a Horned God heavily influenced later religious and magical movements like [[wicca]]. She was one of the chief proponents of the theory of a [[coven]] and became famous with her work ''[[The Witch Cult in Western Europe]]'' (1921). Although her theory about the pre-Christian Witch-cult is now generally considered obsolete, a few academics like [[Carlo Ginzburg]] still adhere to some of her principles, such as the idea that [[fertility cult]]s may have existed in Premodern Europe.
  
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[[Category:Witchcraft]]
 
[[Category:Witchcraft]]

Latest revision as of 23:56, 7 April 2016

Margaret Murray rand.jpg

Margaret Murray (*13 July 1863 in Kolkata- 13 November 1963 in Welwyn) was an English Egyptologist and anthropologist whose theory - also known as the Witch-cult hypothesis - about a surviving pre-Christian, pagan religion devoted to a Horned God heavily influenced later religious and magical movements like wicca. She was one of the chief proponents of the theory of a coven and became famous with her work The Witch Cult in Western Europe (1921). Although her theory about the pre-Christian Witch-cult is now generally considered obsolete, a few academics like Carlo Ginzburg still adhere to some of her principles, such as the idea that fertility cults may have existed in Premodern Europe.


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